Residency

RESIDENCY

  • CAROL SAWYER ARTIST IN RESIDENCE Between January and June Other Sights will share The Foreshore with a series artists who will occupy the ...
  • KARA UZELMAN ARTIST IN RESIDENCE Between January and June Other Sights will share The Foreshore with a series artists who will occupy the ...
  • JUSTIN LANGLOIS ARTIST IN RESIDENCE Over the course of The Foreshore tenure at Access Justin Langlois will join Other Sights, Kimberly Phillips and ...
  • GUADALUPE MARTINEZ ARTIST IN RESIDENCE   Between January and June we will share The Foreshore with a series artists who will occupy the space ...
  • Phase II : Session 1

    DIGNITY AND ACCESS
    Carmen Papalia with Joulene Tse
     
    Tuesday, January 23, 2018, 7:00-8:30 pm
    nə́c̓aʔmat ct Strathcona Branch, Vancouver Public Library
    Wo Soon (Mary) Lee Chan Room
    730 East Hastings Street
     
    Carmen Papalia and Joulene Tse Parent will discuss issues of cultural accessibility and human rights in the city, including Tse’s ongoing research on the history of Indigenous workers on the waterfront, as well as Papalia’s projects leading up to and including his recent conceptual work Open Access, a new, relational model for accessibility that sets a precedent for considerations of agency and power in relation to the disabling social, cultural, and political conditions in a given context.
     
    BIOS

    Born in Vancouver in unceded Coast Salish Territory in 1981, Carmen Papalia is a social practice artist and non-visual learner who makes participatory projects about access to public space, the art institution and visual culture. His work has been featured at The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; the Harvard Art Museums,Cambridge; Tate Liverpool, UK; and locally at Gallery Gachet and the Surrey Art Gallery. Papalia is the recipient of the 2014 Adam Reynolds Memorial Bursary and the 2013 Wynn Newhouse Award. His current work includes the multifunctional acoustic mobility device produced with Sara Hendren’s Investigating Normal Lab at Olin College of Engineering and Let’s Keep in Touch a collaboration with curator Whitney Mashburn that sets a precedent for haptic criticism to become a viable practice within contemporary art.

     

    Joulene Parent’s maternal lines come from the Indigenous Dene Nation of Northern Saskachewan, and paternal lines from a father who was a working immigrant from Canton, China. Most of Joulene’s childhood was raised in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver, the unceded territory of the Squamish, Musqueam and Tsleil-Waututh Nations. She is an active Union Member of the International Longshore Warehouse Union, and currently holds a two year Executive position for Local 500 Vancouver. She also sits on the Vancouver District Labour Council, as a Delegate and Co-Chair on the Women’s Committee.

     

    Image Credit:

    Documentation from White Cane Amplified, 2015

    Screenshot by Philip Lui