Archive

ARCHIVE

  • Blue Cabin Speaker Series: The Foreshore Blue Cabin Speaker Series: The Foreshore Thursday July 12, 7pm – grunt gallery, 350 E 2nd Ave, Vancouver, BC V5T 4R8     As part of the Blue Cabin Speaker ...
  • PHASE II: Session 3 Subterranean Weaving: On the Entwinement of Indigeneity and Hidden Labour in the Making of Contemporary Vancouver Dana Claxton and Jaleh Manoor ...
  • PHASE II : Session 2 LAND LANGUAGE: LAND RESPONSIBILITIES Coll Thrush and Kamala Todd in conversation   Tuesday March 6, 2018, 7 – 8.30pm Mount Pleasant Community Centre 1 ...
  • Phase II : Session 1 DIGNITY AND ACCESS Carmen Papalia with Joulene Tse Tuesday, January 23, 2018, 7:00-8:30 pm nə́c̓aʔmat ct Strathcona Branch, Vancouver Public Library Wo Soon (Mary) ...
  • FLOTILLA: SESSION 19 MARIE BURGE ON STRATEGIES FOR ENGAGEMENT: BASIC INCOME GUARANTEE (BIG) PROMOTION ON PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND & JOURNÉE SANS CULTURE ON CONSIDERING SUSTAINABLE ...
  • FLOTILLA: SESSION 18 LINDSAY DOBBIN ON LISTENING AS A CREATIVE ACT & HARMONY WAGNER ON LISTENING TO THE ENERGY OF THE BODY   September 22 2017  2:30-4:00 Presented ...
  • PERFORMANCE JOHN OLIVER AND CAROL SAWYER   MELT   8pm, Thursday June 22nd, 2017 The Foreshore Other Sights at Access Gallery 222 East Georgia, Vancouver BC   Since the summer ...
  • SESSION 17 CARMEN PAPLIA ON ACCESSIBILITY AS SOCIAL PRACTICE & MICHELLE TUNG ON ACCESS, CONNECTION AND TRANSLATION IN ADVANCING THE INTERESTS OF ABORGINAL COMMUNITIES     Tuesday ...
  • SESSION 16 CYNTHIA BROOKE ON LONGSHORE WORK AND UNION HISTORY & KRISTINA LEE PODESVA ON EBBING: TOWARDS AN ALTERNATIVE VOCABULARY OF VALUE     Tuesday May 30, ...
  • SESSION 15 LAIWAN with SEAGRASS, JELLYFISH and DYING STARS & WILL PLOWRIGHT on UNDERSTANDING INSURGENTS   Tuesday May 16, 7pm The Foreshore Other Sights at Access Gallery 222 East ...
  • SESSION 14 JUSTINE A CHAMBERS on DANCE AS A LIVING ARCHIVE FOR PERSONAL AND CULTURAL HISTORY, RITUAL AND RESISTANCE & DENISE FERREIRA DA SILVA ...
  • SESSION 13 KARA UZELMAN on  REMOTE EXPERIMENTS IN HEALTH CARE AND ART MAKING & HOLLY WARD on HER RECENT REFLECTIONS ON THE PEASANT AS ...
  • PUBLICATION MEETING #1 HOW CAN WE FEEL POWERFUL INSTEAD OF POWERLESS?   April 10, 7pm The Foreshore Other Sights at Access Gallery 222 East Georgia, Vancouver BC   Visiting from ...
  • SESSION 12 ERIC FREDERICKSEN: DEDICATED TO YOU, BUT YOU WEREN’T LISTENING & DR. CISSIE FU on THE POLITICAL & AESTHETIC POTENTIALS OF BODIES IN ...
  • WORKSHOP ELISA FERRARI AND STACEY HO   DEEP LISTENING   March 28th, 6:30pm The Foreshore Other Sights at Access Gallery 222 East Georgia, Vancouver BC   An evening of deep ...
  • OPEN STUDIO GUADALUPE MARTINEZ   OPEN STUDIO   March 25, 4-6 pm The Foreshore Other Sights at Access Gallery 222 East Georgia, Vancouver BC   For her residency at The Foreshore, ...
  • SESSION 11 A WORKSHOP WITH GUADALUPE MARTINEZ AND ZOE KREYE INVESTIGATING GESTURES THAT CONNECT MATERIALITY TO NECESSITY   Saturday March 25 1:30 – 3:30 pm The ...
  • SESSION 10 JACQUELINE HOÀNG NGUYỄN on EXPANDING THE ARCHIVES and DAN PON on THE BRACKISH ECOLOGY OF GRUNT GALLERY’S ARCHIVE AND ARCHIVAL ...
  • WORKSHOP GUADALUPE MARTINEZ AND CAROLINE BERGONZONI March 18th 2 – 4pm The Foreshore Other Sights at Access Gallery 222 East Georgia, Vancouver BC   As part of ...
  • PERFORMANCE JULIE CHAPPLE RETRACING- WE MOVE FORWARD THROUGH TIME     Performance March 16th 7pm 222 East Georgia, Vancouver BC   A durational performance that explores the continuity and ...
  • SESSION 9 ARIANNE GELARDIN on ADDRESSING AMERICA’S SOCIOPOLITCAL CLIMATE THROUGH ART AND PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT and LISA PRENTICE on POLITICS, THERAPY AND ORGANIZING Tuesday March 7, ...
  • SESSION 8 VANESSA RICHARDS on UNSILENCING OURSELVES – THE QUIET SITE OF SHAME and MARCUS YOUSSEF on the THE THEATRE OF ACTIVISM   Tuesday ...
  • SESSION 7   BUSTER SIMPSON on AESTHETICS AND CURIOSITY & COLL THRUSH on CITIES, POWER, AND SURVIVANCE   Tuesday February 7 7:00 – 9:00 pm 222 E. Georgia, Vancouver ...
  • SESSION 6 CECILY NICHOLSON on POETICS ENTRENCHED IN MOVEMENTS and BRACKEN HANUSE CORLETT on RECONCILIATION AS A PROCESS Tuesday January 24th 7:00 – 9:00 ...
  • SESSION 5 GERMAINE KOH on WORKING BETWEEN DISCIPLINES and CAROL SAWYER on COUNTER-NARRATIVES Tuesday January 10th 7:00 – 9:00 pm 222 E Georgia Street, Vancouver   Germaine ...
  • SESSION 4 LINDSAY BROWN on THE LESSONS OF HABITAT ’76 and SHILOH SUKKAU on PUBLIC ART in NORTH EAST FALSE CREEK December 6, ...
  • Field Trip KHAN LEE in conversation with BARBARA COLE at the VANCOUVER ART GALLERY TUESDAY NOVEMBER 22nd 7:00 – 9:00 pm Gallery, Courtroom 302 3rd floor, ...
  • SESSION 3 CHRIS WILLIAMS ON ECO-SOCIALISM AND NLE’S MAKOKO FLOATING SCHOOL TUESDAY NOVEMBER 8 2016 7:00 – 9:00 p.m. This week we will gather to ...
  • SESSION 2 TUESDAY OCTOBER 18 2016 7:00 – 9:00 p.m. JUSTIN LANGLOIS and HOLLY SCHMIDT REPRESENTATIVES FROM THE BLUE CABIN COMMITTEE: GLEN ALTEEN, BARBARA COLE ...
  • SESSION 1 TUESDAY OCTOBER 4 2016 7:00 – 8:30 p.m. 222 E Georgia Street, Vancouver The first of many informal sessions of research and knowledge ...
  • PHASE III : THE FORESHORE LISTENS, PODCAST LAUNCH AND LISTENING PARTY

    PHASE III : THE FORESHORE LISTENS, PODCAST LAUNCH AND LISTENING PARTY

     

     

    The Western Front, 7-9pm, September 26

     

    Join Other Sights and the community of The Foreshore for a special event launching a suite of multi-textured podcasts based on and inspired by The Foreshore Sessions: Vanessa Campbell thinking in and about  hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓  and language reclamation, Stacey Ho considering embodiment and decolonization, Sarah Moore on cones and zones, Dan Pon swimming through confluence and intervention. Sound design by Pietro Sammarco.

    The Foreshore is an Other Sights project in collaboration with Kimberly Phillips, Contemporary Art Gallery & Access Gallery.

     

     

     

    ABOUT THE FORESHORE

    The Foreshore is a collaborative pursuit and shared space between Access Gallery and Other Sights. The Foreshore is inspired by the deep influence of the waterways on our cities and societies on the West Coast. As a place of unclear jurisdiction, and thus of contestation, friction, and constant movement, those who dwell in this zone must continually adapt to a changing environment. As a site, it conjures histories specific to this region: narratives of trade and exchange, habitation and nourishment, resistance and violent erasure. Considering the potential of this zone as both concept and site, the project asks the following: How do we generate conditions of emergence? How can we take up space differently? How do we support unruly practices and futures?

     

    image credit: An unregulated public makes inconvenient demands (GIF) Justin Langlois for The Foreshore, Other Sights @ Access Gallery, 2017

  • Blue Cabin Speaker Series: The Foreshore

    Thursday July 12, 7pm – grunt gallery, 350 E 2nd Ave, Vancouver, BC V5T 4R8

     

     

    As part of the Blue Cabin Speaker Series, artist Jen Weih and artist and curator Vanessa Kwan will speak about The Foreshore’s past and current projects. Sharing insight and intersections between ideas found in the Foreshore and themes and ideas within the Blue Cabin Project, which is a collaborative project between Other Sights, grunt gallery and C3. 

     

    Jen Weih is an artist and educator based in Vancouver, BC. Her projects range from printmaking to video to participatory movement events to projects in public programming and community engagement. She is currently a sessional instructor at Emily Carr University and has been actively involved with Other Sights for Artists’ Projects since 2011. From 2000 to 2003, Jen was programmer at VIVO, where she initiated public and community engaged projects and founded Signal and Noise Media Art Festival. She recently completed an artist residency at the City of Vancouver with City Studio and Living Labs.

     

    Vanessa Kwan is an artist and curator with a focus on collaborative, site-specific and community-engaged practices. At grunt gallery she manages residencies, exhibitions and special projects and is also curator / producer at Other Sights for Artists’ Projects, an artist-run organization that curates and produces artworks for the public realm. She is a founding member of the arts collective Norma who were honoured with a Mayor’s Arts Award for public art in 2012. She regularly writes and publishes on art and culture, and is currently at work on curated projects at venues across the Pacific Rim (Vancouver, Seoul and Sydney) exploring artist-led creative exchange.

     

    ABOUT THE BLUE CABIN PROJECT

    The Blue Cabin Floating Artist Residency brings forward a desire and need for alternate modes of living and working and expands our understanding of what constitutes public space.

     

    Representing the last vestiges of a cultural tradition of artists and others living in squatters’ shacks along the foreshores of this region’s waterways, Al Neil and Carole Itter’s Blue Cabin was one of many structures that dotted the shores of the Burrard Inlet. When the adjacent land occupied by MacKenzie Barge and Shipbuilding for 100 years was sold to Polygon Homes for redevelopment, the cabin’s demolition seemed imminent. Working collaboratively and with the support of many, Other Sights, grunt gallery and C3 moved the cabin to a nearby storage site and then on to Maplewood Farms where, in the sheep pasture, it underwent extensive repair by artist team Sus and Jeremy Borsos.

     

    The organizations’ vision for the cabin is to outfit it as an artist studio and to mount it to a floating platform alongside a tiny house, to serve as a vital, off the grid, multi-disciplinary floating artist residency. The idea to set the cabin adrift from ownership or permanent location speaks to its history and occupation of the foreshore as a generative space. The Blue Cabin Floating Artist Residency is unique to this region while global in its reach.

  • PHASE II: Session 3

    Subterranean Weaving: On the Entwinement of Indigeneity and Hidden Labour in the Making of Contemporary Vancouver
    Dana Claxton and Jaleh Manoor in conversation

     

    Tuesday, June 5,  2018, 7 – 8.30pm
    nə́c̓aʔmat ct Strathcona Branch, Vancouver Public Library
    Wo Soon (Mary) Lee Chan Room, 730 East Hastings Street

    Attendance is Free

    Join celebrated local artist Dana Claxton and art historian Jaleh Mansoor as they debate the following questions, prompted by Claxton’s new series of photographic works: do unresolved aboriginal sovereignty and economics, a housing crisis precipitated by tectonic shifts in global wealth distribution and finally culture, a genre nested within lens-based practices responsive to the collapse of medium specificity, have anything to do with one another? Does the international dispersal of swelling wealth, of surplus value generated elsewhere, have anything to do with the decomposition and re-composition of a local aesthetic? Who or what stands at the vanishing point of two seemingly unrelated phenomenon that locate Vancouver on the GPS of global culture?

    This event is part of The Foreshore, presented in partnership with the multi-disciplinary artist collective Other Sights for Artists’ Projects. The Foreshore hosts a series of roving discursive events held at community centres throughout the city of Vancouver, aiming to generate questions and confluence inspired by the conditions of the foreshore, the land along the edge of a body of water that is repeatedly submerged and revealed by the tide. In Vancouver, the term conjures specific histories of trade and exchange, habitation and nourishment, resistance and violent erasure. It might similarly evoke our contemporary lived situation in this city. Considering the potential of this zone as both a metaphor and physical site, year two of The Foreshore initiative pairs together returning speakers and guests of their choosing to deepen a generative and cross-disciplinary conversation around the following questions: Can there be land that is not property? How do we bring the centre to the edge? What is, as yet, unseen?

    Image: Dana Claxton, ‘Subterranean Weaving: On the Entwinement of Indigeneity and Hidden Labour in the Making of Contemporary Vancouver’, 2018, (Work in progress). Courtesy the artist

  • PHASE II : Session 2

    LAND LANGUAGE: LAND RESPONSIBILITIES
    Coll Thrush and Kamala Todd in conversation

     

    Tuesday March 6, 2018, 7 – 8.30pm
    Mount Pleasant Community Centre
    1 Kingsway
    Art Room (next to South entrance)

     

    Attendance is Free

     

    Creating home and a sense of place means building relationships. How well do we relate/give back/listen to the land and waters that are our home? Vancouver is so often seen as an international city belonging to no one/everyone. Its landscapes and narratives have been transformed and framed in ways that showcase the Anglo-colonial culture as the founders and caretakers of this coastal city. How are newcomers/settlers/guests/visitors complicit in this overwriting of Coast Salish people and their continuity on this land since time out of mind? How do the stories (re)emerge and remind us all that this is a place with ancient laws, relationships, histories, ancestors, cosmologies which are in fact the guiding frameworks for life on this Musqueam, Tsleil-Waututh, Squamish place? This is a conversation towards decolonizing the city, asking questions about learning the laws and expectations and responsibilities before we assume permission and right mindedness to “come ashore” and be good visitors.

     

    BIOS

    Coll Thrush is Associate Professor of history at the University of British Columbia, where he teaches Indigenous, settler colonial and place-based histories. He is the author of Native Seattle: Histories from the Crossing-Over Place. He is also the co-editor of Phantom Past, Indigenous Presence: Native Ghosts in North American Culture and History (2011) and Indigenous London: Native Travelers at the Heart of Empire (2016). His current project, entitled Slaughter Town, focuses on landscape, trauma, and memory in his hometown of Auburn, Washington, formerly known as Slaughter.

     

    Kamala Todd is a Metis-Cree community planner who makes films and writes about the stories and cultures layered within the Indigenous lands upon which she is a grateful guest. She has a Masters degree in Geography (UBC) and is the author of numerous documentary films and community arts projects. For six years she was the City of Vancouver’s Aboriginal Social Planner, and she continues to work with the City as an independent consultant to help build relationships within the context of (re)conciliation. She writes and directs for children’s television, including the Indigenous science series Coyote’s Crazy Smart Science Show and the Cree language series Nehiyawetan, both on APTN. Todd lives with her partner and two sons on the Sunshine Coast.

     

     

     

    Audio of the Event:

     

    Image Credit: Alberto Cruz — Creative Commons

  • Phase II : Session 1

    DIGNITY AND ACCESS
    Carmen Papalia with Joulene Tse

    Tuesday, January 23, 2018, 7:00-8:30 pm
    nə́c̓aʔmat ct Strathcona Branch, Vancouver Public Library
    Wo Soon (Mary) Lee Chan Room
    730 East Hastings Street

    Carmen Papalia and Joulene Tse Parent will discuss issues of cultural accessibility and human rights in the city, including Tse’s ongoing research on the history of Indigenous workers on the waterfront, as well as Papalia’s projects leading up to and including his recent conceptual work Open Access, a new, relational model for accessibility that sets a precedent for considerations of agency and power in relation to the disabling social, cultural, and political conditions in a given context.

    BIOS

    Born in Vancouver in unceded Coast Salish Territory in 1981, Carmen Papalia is a social practice artist and non-visual learner who makes participatory projects about access to public space, the art institution and visual culture. His work has been featured at The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; the Harvard Art Museums,Cambridge; Tate Liverpool, UK; and locally at Gallery Gachet and the Surrey Art Gallery. Papalia is the recipient of the 2014 Adam Reynolds Memorial Bursary and the 2013 Wynn Newhouse Award. His current work includes the multifunctional acoustic mobility device produced with Sara Hendren’s Investigating Normal Lab at Olin College of Engineering and Let’s Keep in Touch a collaboration with curator Whitney Mashburn that sets a precedent for haptic criticism to become a viable practice within contemporary art.

     

    Joulene Parent’s maternal lines come from the Indigenous Dene Nation of Northern Saskachewan, and paternal lines from a father who was a working immigrant from Canton, China. Most of Joulene’s childhood was raised in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver, the unceded territory of the Squamish, Musqueam and Tsleil-Waututh Nations. She is an active Union Member of the International Longshore Warehouse Union, and currently holds a two year Executive position for Local 500 Vancouver. She also sits on the Vancouver District Labour Council, as a Delegate and Co-Chair on the Women’s Committee.

     

    Image Credit:

    Documentation from White Cane Amplified, 2015

    Screenshot by Philip Lui

     

    Audio recording of the event:

  • SESSION 16

    CYNTHIA BROOKE ON LONGSHORE WORK AND UNION HISTORY

    &

    KRISTINA LEE PODESVA ON EBBING: TOWARDS AN ALTERNATIVE VOCABULARY OF VALUE

     

     

    Tuesday May 30, 7pm

    The Foreshore

    Other Sights at Access Gallery

    222 East Georgia, Vancouver BC

     

     

    Please join us for two short presentations followed by discussion.

     

    Based on her experience as a Stevedore and member of the International Longshore and Warehouse Union BROOKE will discuss some of the history of the union as well as how the shift toward exclusion and security in the ports and shipping industry obscures our understanding of the movement of goods, the people who do that work and their experiences.

     

    LEE PODESVA will share some thoughts on ebbing as a means for developing a vocabulary of value that turns away from the principles of gain, growth, and accumulation, among other economic delusions. This discussion will also share very preliminary research on tides, especially low tides, to open up a space of practice that knits corporeal, terrestrial, and celestial contexts with social realities. Let us consider what an alternative vocabulary of value might look like. What forms might it take economically, aesthetically, psycho-spiritually?

     

     

    BIOS

    Cynthia Brooke is a Stevedore, member of of the International Longshore and Warehouse Union, and former executive member of ILWU local 500 executive. She is also generally active in accessibility issues, and specifically for the Vancouver Folk Music Festival where she co-coordinates access security. She also provides port, and shipping facility  tours for artists participating in access Gallery’s 23 Days at Sea residency program.

     

    Kristina Lee Podesva is an artist, writer, editor, and publisher working between art making, critical writing, and experimental publishing.  Taking many forms, her practice has had an ongoing concern with language and the politics of discourse. Her work has appeared at Artspeak (Vancouver), Darling Foundry (Montreal), Dorsky Gallery (Long Island City), the Power Plant (Toronto), and the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts (San Francisco), among other venues. From 2005 to 2015, she was Editor at Fillip. She is currently in the process of forming the Bruna Press + Archive in Bellingham, Washington.

     

    kristinaleepodesva

     

    Image Credits:

    A strike supporter harangues police during the Battle of Ballantyne Pier. This photo ran on the front page of the June 19, 1935 Vancouver Sun.

    &

    Low tide on the west beach of Baltrum in the Niedersächsisches Wattenmeer National Park (Niedersachsen, Deutschland). Photo taken by Gisbert1. Color and contrast adjusted by Kristina Lee Podesva.

     

    Audio recording of the event:

     

  • SESSION 10

    JACQUELINE HOÀNG NGUYỄN on EXPANDING THE ARCHIVES and DAN PON on THE BRACKISH ECOLOGY OF GRUNT GALLERY’S ARCHIVE AND ARCHIVAL PROJECTS

     

    March 21, 7pm
    The Foreshore
    Other Sights at Access Gallery
    222 East Georgia, Vancouver BC

     

    JACQUELINE HOÀNG NGUYỄN will discuss her current collaboration with grunt gallery, The Making of an Archive, which is an alternative depository for vernacular photography in which diverse forms of civic engagement performed by minority groups––from care work to protests in public space––are digitized for archival purposes.

     

    PON will present a conceptual view of grunt gallery’s archival initiatives through the rushes of the coastal riparian zone including a survey of past and current projects. Halophyte stands imagines the archive as a species of saline tolerant plant and explores some of the characteristics and parallels that make these organisms unique.

     

    BIOS

    Jacqueline Hoàng Nguyễn completed the Whitney Independent Study Program, New York, in 2011, having obtained her MFA and a post-graduate diploma in Critical Studies from the Malmö Art Academy, Sweden, in 2005, and a BFA from Concordia University, Montreal, in 2003. She has been awarded many grants and fellowships, and her work has been exhibited internationally. In 2015, she was the first artist-in- residence at the Museum of Ethnography in Stockholm. The residency was part of SWICH – Sharing a World of Inclusion, Creativity and Heritage – a collaborative project involving ten European museums of Ethnography and World Cultures. She is currently co-editing Crating the World: Displaced Myths, Desires and Meanings a compendium to Nguyễn’s exhibition Black Atlas (2016) presented at the Museum of Ethnography. Based on archival photographs, the publication and the exhibition explore the implications of the administration of racialized labour for transporting material culture from foreign countries to the museum’s storage.

    jacquelinehoangnguyen

     

    Dan Pon is a librarian based in unceded Coast Salish territories. He holds a MLIS degree from UBC (2012) and works as a librarian at Langara College and the West Vancouver Memorial Library. Dan manages the archive at grunt gallery and is currently conducting research on behalf of the Belkin Art Gallery and Geoffrey Farmer’s outdoor public art project Nothing Can Separate Us (When the Wheel Turns Why Does a Pot Emerge?).

    grunt archives

     

     

    Image credits

    Jacqueline Hoàng Nguyễn  “Courtesy the artist”

    Photo: Garry Ross, courtesy Phil Beeman

     

    Audio recording of the event:

     

  • SESSION 9

    ARIANNE GELARDIN on ADDRESSING AMERICA’S SOCIOPOLITCAL CLIMATE THROUGH ART AND PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT
    and
    LISA PRENTICE on POLITICS, THERAPY AND ORGANIZING

    Tuesday March 7, 2017, 7:00 PM

    222 East Georgia, Vancouver BC

     

    GELARDIN will present a selection of projects from StoreFrontLab’s (San Francisco) current season of installations, happenings, discussions and workshops that address America’s sociopolitical climate using the agency of art and public engagement. The series, entitled NOW!, invites an evaluation of progress and demands an end to regressive values through direct action and counteraction.

     

    PRENTICE asks do therapeutic practices and theories help or hinder social change? Considering the longstanding frictional relationship between Marxism and Freudian theory to the endpoint of today’s tendency to look for an analysis of political events in psychological terms, it would seem that therapy and politics make uneasy bedfellows.

     

     

     

    Arianne Gelardin is curator at StoreFrontLab, an experimental exhibition space located in San Francisco, California. Founded in 2011 by architect David Baker and Yosh Asato, StoreFrontLab prides itself as “a small space for big ideas,” supporting conceptual and city-oriented projects that rely heavily on public dialogue and participation. Arianne also consults on the design and fabrication of public artworks for the San Francisco Arts Commission, facilitating the production of such works from proposals to architectural details. Working at the intersection of art, phenomenology, and sociology, Arianne’s personal practice finds form through writing, happenings, and visual language.

     

    StoreFrontLab

    StoreFrontLab Facebook

    StoreFrontLab Instragram

     

    Lisa Prentice is a manual therapist, artist, and an ongoing researcher who explores somatic approaches to meaning making and understanding, and the relationship of human body(s) and the body politic. She is currently in private practice and has also worked with diverse groups including youth, artists and persons with mental health labels. She draws influence from the work of Wilhelm Reich, Martha Eddy, R.D. Laing, and Shou-Yu Liang.

     

    Image Credits:

    StoreFrontLab: NOW

    Image: Tattoos of Sigmund Freud and Karl Marx, images found online

     

    Audio recording of the event: